NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Using School Choice Lotteries to Test Measures of School Effectiveness

David J. Deming

NBER Working Paper No. 19803
Issued in January 2014
NBER Program(s):   CH   ED   LS

Value-added models (VAMs) are increasingly used to measure school effectiveness. Yet random variation in school attendance is necessary to test the validity of VAMs, and to guide the selection of models for measuring causal effects of schools. In this paper, I use random assignment from a public school choice lottery to test the predictive power of VAM specifications. In VAMs with minimal controls and two or more years of prior data, I fail to reject the hypothesis that school effects are unbiased. Overall, many commonly used VAMs are accurate predictors of student achievement gains.

You may purchase this paper on-line in .pdf format from SSRN.com ($5) for electronic delivery.

Information about Free Papers

You should expect a free download if you are a subscriber, a corporate associate of the NBER, a journalist, an employee of the U.S. federal government with a ".GOV" domain name, or a resident of nearly any developing country or transition economy.

If you usually get free papers at work/university but do not at home, you can either connect to your work VPN or proxy (if any) or elect to have a link to the paper emailed to your work email address below. The email address must be connected to a subscribing college, university, or other subscribing institution. Gmail and other free email addresses will not have access.

E-mail:

An online appendix is available for this publication.

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w19803

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Angrist w19774 The Perils of Peer Effects
Hoxby w19816 The Economics of Online Postsecondary Education: MOOCs, Nonselective Education, and Highly Selective Education
Reinhart and Rogoff w19823 Recovery from Financial Crises: Evidence from 100 Episodes
Cook, Dodge, Farkas, Fryer, Guryan, Ludwig, Mayer, Pollack, and Steinberg w19862 The (Surprising) Efficacy of Academic and Behavioral Intervention with Disadvantaged Youth: Results from a Randomized Experiment in Chicago
Black, Arnold Lincove, Cullinane, and Veron w19842 Can You Leave High School Behind?
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us