Ideology and Online News

Matthew Gentzkow, Jesse M. Shapiro

NBER Working Paper No. 19675
Issued in November 2013
NBER Program(s):   IO

News consumption is moving online. If this move fundamentally changes how news is produced and consumed it will have important ramifications for politics. In this chapter we formulate a model of the supply and demand of news online that is motivated by descriptive features of online news consumption. We estimate the demand model using a combination of microdata and aggregate moments from a panel of Internet users. We evaluate the fit of the model to key features of the data and use it to compute the predictions of the supply model. We discuss how such a model can inform debates about the effects of the Internet on political polarization and other outcomes of interest.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w19675

Published: Ideology and Online News, Matthew Gentzkow, Jesse M. Shapiro. in Economic Analysis of the Digital Economy, Goldfarb, Greenstein, and Tucker. 2015

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