NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Migration to the US and Marital Mobility

Rebekka Christopoulou, Dean R. Lillard

NBER Working Paper No. 19495
Issued in October 2013
NBER Program(s):   LS

We combine survey data on British and German immigrants in the US with data on natives in Britain and Germany to estimate the causal effect of migration on educational mobility through cross-national marriage. To control for selective mating, we instrument educational attainment using government spending on education in the years each person was of school-age. To control for selective migration, we instrument the migration decision using inflows of immigrants to the US during puberty and early adulthood. We find that migration causes men to marry up and women to marry down, but self-selection into migration and marriage dampens down these effects.

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This paper was revised on March 20, 2014

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w19495

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