NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Does Economic Growth Reduce Corruption? Theory and Evidence from Vietnam

Jie Bai, Seema Jayachandran, Edmund J. Malesky, Benjamin A. Olken

NBER Working Paper No. 19483
Issued in September 2013

---- Acknowledgements ----

We thank Lori Beaman, Raymond Fisman, Chang-Tai Hsieh, Supreet Kaur, Neil McCulloch, Andrei Shleifer, Matthew Stephenson, Eric Verhoogen, and Ekaterina Zhuravskaya for helpful comments. The PCI survey data used in this paper was funded by USAID, and was collected by Development Alternatives Incorporated with the cooperation of the Vietnam Chamber of Commerce and Industry. The views expressed here are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of any of these organizations or the National Bureau of Economic Research.

---- Disclosure of Financial Relationships for Edmund J. Malesky ----

Disclosure Statement for “Does Economic Growth Reduce Corruption? Theory and Evidence from

Vietnam”

Edmund Malesky

September 20, 2013

Since 2005, the author has served as a paid consultant for Development Alternatives Incorporated (DAI), a for-profit development consultancy funded by USAID to conduct the Vietnam Provincial Competitiveness Index (PCI) survey, the primary data set used in this paper. In his capacity as consultant, the author works with the Vietnam Chamber of Commerce and Industry (VCCI) to design the sampling strategy and survey instrument for the PCI survey. The author also writes the annual development report about the survey.

The PCI data are released publicly, and the author has no special, proprietary use of the data. His access is the same as any researcher who requests the data from DAI, USAID, or VCCI.

Findings of the paper were shared by the author with DAI, USAID, and VCCI, but these entities do not have the right to review the paper prior to its circulation.

USAID, DAI, and VCCI all either fund or take part in programming to reduce corruption in Vietnam. In this sense, they are interested parties. The paper, however, does not evaluate any of their specific programming efforts.

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