NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Decentralization in Developing Economies

Lucie Gadenne, Monica Singhal

NBER Working Paper No. 19402
Issued in September 2013, Revised in March 2014
NBER Program(s):DEV, PE, POL

Standard models of fiscal federalism suggest many benefits of decentralization in developing economies, and there has been a recent push toward decentralization around the world. However, developing countries presently still have less decentralization, particularly on the revenue side, than both developed countries today and the United States and Europe historically. We consider how the trade-offs associated with fiscal federalism apply in developing countries and discuss reasons for their relatively low levels of decentralization. We also consider additional features relevant to federalism in developing economies, such as the prevalence of nongovernmental organizations and the role of social incentives in policy design.

download in pdf format
   (207 K)

email paper

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w19402

Published: Singhal, Monica, and Lucie Gadenne. 2014. “Decentralization in Developing Economies.” Annual Review of Economics 6: 581-604. citation courtesy of

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded* these:
Caldeira, Foucault, and Rota-Graziosi w18118 Does Decentralization Facilitate Access to Poverty-Related Services? Evidence from Benin
Wallis and Oates Decentralization in the Public Sector: An Empirical Study of State and Local Government
Banerjee and Duflo w19848 Under the Thumb of History? Political Institutions and the Scope for Action
Caldeira, Foucault, and Rota-Graziosi w18126 Decentralisation in Africa and the Nature of Local Governments' Competition: Evidence from Benin
Ravallion w19210 The Idea of Antipoverty Policy
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Themes
Data
People
About

National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us