NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

The Slowdown in the Economic Assimilation of Immigrants: Aging and Cohort Effects Revisited Again

George J. Borjas

NBER Working Paper No. 19116
Issued in June 2013, Revised in May 2014
NBER Program(s):   LS

This paper examines the evolution of immigrant earnings in the United States between 1970 and 2010. There are cohort effects not only in wage levels, with more recent cohorts having lower entry wages through 1990, but also in the rate of wage growth, with more recent cohorts experiencing less economic assimilation. The slowdown in assimilation is partly related to a concurrent decline in the rate at which the new immigrants add to their human capital stock, as measured by English language proficiency. The data also suggest that the rate of economic assimilation is significantly lower for larger national origin groups.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w19116

Published: George J. Borjas, 2015. "The Slowdown in the Economic Assimilation of Immigrants: Aging and Cohort Effects Revisited Again," Journal of Human Capital, vol 9(4), pages 483-517.

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