NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Domestic Institutions as a Source of Comparative Advantage

Nathan Nunn, Daniel Trefler

NBER Working Paper No. 18851
Issued in February 2013
NBER Program(s):   DAE   ITI   POL

Domestic institutions can have profound effects on international trade. This chapter reviews the theoretical and empirical underpinnings of this insight. Particular attention is paid to contracting institutions and to comparative advantage, where the bulk of the research has been concentrated. We also consider the reverse causation running from comparative advantage to domestic institutions

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w18851

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