NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Birthdays, Schooling, and Crime: New Evidence on the Dropout-Crime Nexus

Philip J. Cook, Songman Kang

NBER Working Paper No. 18791
Issued in February 2013
NBER Program(s):   ED

Based on administrative data for five cohorts of public school children in North Carolina, we demonstrate that those born just after the cut date for starting school are likely to outperform those born just before in reading and math in middle school, and are less likely to be involved in juvenile delinquency. On the other hand, those born after the cut date are more likely to drop out of high school before graduation and commit a felony offense by age 19. We also present suggestive evidence that the higher dropout rate is due to the fact that youths born after the cut date have longer exposure to the legal possibility of dropping out. The “crime” and “dropout” differences are strong but somewhat muted by the fact that youths born just before the cut date are substantially more likely to be held back in school. We document considerable heterogeneity in educational and criminal outcomes by sex, race and other indicators of socioeconomic disadvantage.

You may purchase this paper on-line in .pdf format from SSRN.com ($5) for electronic delivery.

Information about Free Papers

You should expect a free download if you are a subscriber, a corporate associate of the NBER, a journalist, an employee of the U.S. federal government with a ".GOV" domain name, or a resident of nearly any developing country or transition economy.

If you usually get free papers at work/university but do not at home, you can either connect to your work VPN or proxy (if any) or elect to have a link to the paper emailed to your work email address below. The email address must be connected to a subscribing college, university, or other subscribing institution. Gmail and other free email addresses will not have access.

E-mail:

Acknowledgments

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w18791

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Barrow, Claessens, and Schanzenbach w18889 The Impact of Chicago’s Small High School Initiative
Anderson, Cesur, and Tekin w18656 Youth Depression and Future Criminal Behavior
Chalfin and McCrary w18815 The Effect of Police on Crime: New Evidence from U.S. Cities, 1960-2010
Meghir, Palme, and Schnabel w18145 The Effect of Education Policy on Crime: An Intergenerational Perspective
Billings, Deming, and Rockoff w18487 School Segregation, Educational Attainment and Crime: Evidence from the end of busing in Charlotte-Mecklenburg
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us