NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Air Pollution and Infant Mortality: Evidence from the Expansion of Natural Gas Infrastructure

Resul Cesur, Erdal Tekin, Aydogan Ulker

NBER Working Paper No. 18736
Issued in January 2013
NBER Program(s):   CH   DEV   EEE   HE

Natural gas, as a relatively clean, abundant, and highly-efficient source of energy, has emerged as an increasingly attractive fuel in recent years. In this paper, we examine the impact of widespread adoption of natural gas as a source of fuel on infant mortality in Turkey, using variation across provinces and over time in the intensity of natural gas utilization. Our results indicate that the expansion of natural gas infrastructure has resulted in a significant decrease in the rate of infant mortality in Turkey. According to our point estimates, a one-percentage point increase in the rate of subscriptions to natural gas services would cause the infant mortality rate to decline by 4.1 percent, which would translate into in approximately 357 infant lives saved in 2011 alone. This finding is robust to a large number of specifications.

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This paper was revised on June 20, 2014

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w18736

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