NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Do Classmate Effects Fade Out?

Robert Bifulco, Jason M. Fletcher, Sun Jung Oh, Stephen L. Ross

NBER Working Paper No. 18648
Issued in December 2012
NBER Program(s):   CH   ED

Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, this study examines the impact of high school cohort composition on the educational and labor market outcomes of individuals during their early 20s and again during their late 20s and early 30s. We find that the positive effects of having more high school classmates with a college educated mother on college attendance in the years immediately following high school fade out as students reach their later 20s and early 30s, and are not followed by comparable effects on college completion and labor market outcomes.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w18648

Published: Labour Economics Volume 29, August 2014, Pages 83–90 Cover image Do high school peers have persistent effects on college attainment and other life outcomes? Robert Bifulcoa, , , Jason M. Fletcherb, 1, , Sun Jung Oha, 2, , Stephen L. Rossc, 3,

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