NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

The Impacts of Microcredit: Evidence from Bosnia and Herzegovina

Britta Augsburg, Ralph De Haas, Heike Harmgart, Costas Meghir

NBER Working Paper No. 18538
Issued in November 2012
NBER Program(s):   DEV   ED   LS

We use an RCT to analyze the impacts of microcredit. The study population consists of loan applicants who were marginally rejected by an MFI in Bosnia. A random subset of these were offered a loan. We provide evidence of higher self-employment, increases in inventory, a reduction in the incidence of wage work and an increase in the labor supply of 16-19 year olds in the household's business. We also present some evidence of increases in profits and a reduction in consumption and savings. There is no evidence that the program increased overall household income.

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This paper was revised on June 18, 2014

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w18538

Published: Britta Augsburg & Ralph De Haas & Heike Harmgart & Costas Meghir, 2015. "The Impacts of Microcredit: Evidence from Bosnia and Herzegovina," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(1), pages 183-203, January. citation courtesy of

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