NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Mismatch Unemployment

Ayşegül Şahin, Joseph Song, Giorgio Topa, Giovanni L. Violante

NBER Working Paper No. 18265
Issued in August 2012
NBER Program(s):   EFG   LS

We develop a framework where mismatch between vacancies and job seekers across sectors translates into higher unemployment by lowering the aggregate job-finding rate. We use this framework to measure the contribution of mismatch to the recent rise in U.S. unemployment by exploiting two sources of cross-sectional data on vacancies, JOLTS and HWOL, a new database covering the universe of online U.S. job advertisements. Mismatch across industries and occupations explains at most 1/3 of the total observed increase in the unemployment rate, whereas geographical mismatch plays no apparent role. The share of the rise in unemployment explained by occupational mismatch is increasing in the education level.

You may purchase this paper on-line in .pdf format from SSRN.com ($5) for electronic delivery.

Information about Free Papers

You should expect a free download if you are a subscriber, a corporate associate of the NBER, a journalist, an employee of the U.S. federal government with a ".GOV" domain name, or a resident of nearly any developing country or transition economy.

If you usually get free papers at work/university but do not at home, you can either connect to your work VPN or proxy (if any) or elect to have a link to the paper emailed to your work email address below. The email address must be connected to a subscribing college, university, or other subscribing institution. Gmail and other free email addresses will not have access.

E-mail:

Acknowledgments

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w18265

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Diamond w18761 Cyclical Unemployment, Structural Unemployment
Lazear and Spletzer w18386 The United States Labor Market: Status Quo or A New Normal?
Gordon w18315 Is U.S. Economic Growth Over? Faltering Innovation Confronts the Six Headwinds
Jaimovich and Siu w18334 The Trend is the Cycle: Job Polarization and Jobless Recoveries
Mian and Sufi w17830 What explains high unemployment? The aggregate demand channel
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us