NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

The Aftermath of Accelerating Algebra: Evidence from a District Policy Initiative

Charles T. Clotfelter, Helen F. Ladd, Jacob L. Vigdor

NBER Working Paper No. 18161
Issued in June 2012
NBER Program(s):Economics of Education

In 2002/03, the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools in North Carolina initiated a broad program of accelerating entry into algebra coursework. The proportion of moderately-performing students taking algebra in 8th grade increased from half to 85%, then reverted to baseline levels, in the span of just five years. We use this policy-induced variation to infer the impact of accelerated entry into algebra on student performance in math courses as students progress through high school. Students affected by the acceleration initiative scored significantly lower on end-of-course tests in Algebra I, and were either significantly less likely or no more likely to pass standard follow-up courses, Geometry and Algebra II, on a college-preparatory timetable. Although we also find that the district assigned teachers with weaker qualifications to Algebra I classes in the first year of the acceleration, this reduction in teacher quality accounts for only a small portion of the overall effect.

download in pdf format
   (226 K)

email paper

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w18161

Published: Charles T. Clotfelter & Helen F. Ladd & Jacob L. Vigdor, 2015. "The Aftermath of Accelerating Algebra: Evidence from District Policy Initiatives," Journal of Human Resources, vol 50(1), pages 159-188.

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded* these:
Clotfelter, Ladd, and Vigdor w18649 Algebra for 8th Graders: Evidence on its Effects from 10 North Carolina Districts
Levitt, List, Neckermann, and Sadoff w18165 The Behavioralist Goes to School: Leveraging Behavioral Economics to Improve Educational Performance
Clotfelter, Ladd, and Vigdor w13617 Teacher Credentials and Student Achievement in High School: A Cross-Subject Analysis with Student Fixed Effects
Meghir, Palme, and Schnabel w18145 The Effect of Education Policy on Crime: An Intergenerational Perspective
Pallais w19480 Small Differences that Matter: Mistakes in Applying to College
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Themes
Data
People
About

National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us