NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Reexamining the Impact of Family Planning Programs on U.S. Fertility: Evidence from the War on Poverty and the Early Years of Title X

Martha J. Bailey

NBER Working Paper No. 17343
Issued in August 2011

---- Acknowledgements -----

This project was supported by the National Science Foundation (Grant 6334659); the National Bureau of Economic Research’s (NBER) Dissertation Grant for the Study of the Nonprofit Sector (2003-2005); the University of Michigan’s National Poverty Center (NPC) and Robert Wood Johnson Health and Society Programs; the University of Michigan Population Research Center’s Eva Mueller Award; and the National Institute of Health (Grant HD058065-01A1). I also received grant support from the University of Kentucky Center for Poverty Research (UKCPR) through the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (Grant 5 UO1 PE000002-05). The opinions and conclusions expressed herein are solely those of the author and should not be construed as representing the opinions or policy of the NBER, NPC or UKCPR or any agency of the federal government. I am grateful to Doug Almond and Hillary Hoynes for sharing the Regional Economic Information System (REIS) data for the 1959 to 1978 period and to the Guttmacher Institute and Ted Joyce for sharing information on abortion providers from 1973 to 1979. I also thank John Bound, Nzinga Broussard, Charlie Brown, John DiNardo, Daniel Eisenberg, Hilary Hoynes, David Lam, Ron Lee, Daniel Leeds, Paul Rhode, Mel Stephens, and Jeff Smith for helpful comments and suggestions. Exceptional research assistance was provided by Andrew Goodman-Bacon, Allie Davido, Nic Duquette, Emily Collins, Brad Hershbein, and Jessica Williams.

return to bibliography page

 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us