NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

The Long-Run Impacts of Early Childhood Education: Evidence From a Failed Policy Experiment

Philip DeCicca, Justin D. Smith

NBER Working Paper No. 17085
Issued in May 2011
NBER Program(s):   ED

We investigate short and long-term effects of early childhood education using variation created by a unique policy experiment in British Columbia, Canada. Our findings imply starting Kindergarten one year late substantially reduces the probability of repeating the third grade, and meaningfully increases in tenth grade math and reading scores. Effects are highest for low income students and males. Estimates suggest that entering kindergarten early may have a detrimental effect on future outcomes.

download in pdf format
   (392 K)

email paper

This paper is available as PDF (392 K) or via email.

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w17085

Published: DeCicca, Philip & Smith, Justin, 2013. "The long-run impacts of early childhood education: Evidence from a failed policy experiment," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 41-59. citation courtesy of

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Gelber and Isen w17704 Children’s Schooling and Parents’ Investment in Children: Evidence from the Head Start Impact Study
Loeb, Fuller, Kagan, Carrol, and Carroll w9954 Child Care in Poor Communities: Early Learning Effects of Type, Quality, and Stability
Cascio w14951 Do Investments in Universal Early Education Pay Off? Long-term Effects of Introducing Kindergartens into Public Schools
Ruhm w7666 Parental Employment and Child Cognitive Development
Heckman, Moon, Pinto, Savelyev, and Yavitz w16238 Analyzing Social Experiments as Implemented: A Reexamination of the Evidence From the HighScope Perry Preschool Program
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us