NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Individual and Aggregate Labor Supply With Coordinated Working Times

Richard Rogerson

NBER Working Paper No. 16636
Issued in December 2010
NBER Program(s):   EFG

I analyze two extensions to the standard model of life cycle labor supply that feature operative choices along both the intensive and extensive margin. The first assumes that individuals face different continuous wage-hours schedules. The second assumes that all work must be coordinated across individuals. These models look similar qualitatively but have very different implications for how aggregate labor supply responds to changes in taxes. In the first model, curvature in the utility from leisure function plays relatively little role in determining the overall change in hours worked, whereas in the second model it is of first order importance. The second model has important implications for what data is best able to provide evidence on the extent of curvature in the utility from leisure function.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w16636

Published: Richard Rogerson, 2011. "Individual and Aggregate Labor Supply with Coordinated Working Times," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 43, pages 7-37, 08. citation courtesy of

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