NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

The Economics of Cultural Transmission and Socialization

Alberto Bisin, Thierry Verdier

NBER Working Paper No. 16512
Issued in November 2010
NBER Program(s):   POL

Cultural transmission arguably plays an important role in the determination of many fundamental preference traits (e.g., discounting, risk aversion and altruism) and most cultural traits, social norms, and ideological tenets ( e.g., attitudes towards family and fertility practices, and attitudes in the job market). It is, however, the pervasive evidence of the resilience of ethnic and religious traits across generations that motivates a large fraction of the theoretical and empirical literature on cultural transmission. This article reviews the main contributions of models of cultural transmission, from theoretical and empirical perspectives. It presents their implications regarding the long-run population dynamics of cultural traits and cultural heterogeneity, the world's geographical fragmentation by ethic and religious traits, at any given time. Finally, the paper reviews the empirical literature which estimates various properties of cultural transmission mechanisms as well as the population dynamics of specific traits.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w16512

Published: `The Economics of Cultural Transmission and Socialization,' with Thierry Verdier, in Handbook of Social Economics , Jess Ben- habib, Alberto Bisin, Matt Jackson, eds., Elsevier, 2010.

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