NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Supply Responses to Digital Distribution: Recorded Music and Live Performances

Julie Holland Mortimer, Chris Nosko, Alan Sorensen

NBER Working Paper No. 16507
Issued in October 2010
NBER Program(s):   IO

Changes in technologies for reproducing and redistributing digital goods (e.g., music, movies, software, books) have dramatically affected profitability of these goods, and raised concerns for future development of socially valuable digital products. However, broader illegitimate distribution of digital goods may have offsetting demand implications for legitimate sales of complementary non-digital products. We examine the negative impact of file-sharing on recorded music sales and offsetting implications for live concert performances. We find that file-sharing reduces album sales but increases live performance revenues for small artists, perhaps through increased awareness. The impact on live performance revenues for large, well-known artists is negligible.

download in pdf format
   (206 K)

email paper

This paper is available as PDF (206 K) or via email.

Acknowledgments

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w16507

Published: Mortimer, Julie Holland & Nosko, Chris & Sorensen, Alan, 2012. "Supply responses to digital distribution: Recorded music and live performances," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 3-14.

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Waldfogel w16882 Bye, Bye, Miss American Pie? The Supply of New Recorded Music Since Napster
Connolly and Krueger w11282 Rockonomics: The Economics of Popular Music
Rob and Waldfogel w10874 Piracy on the High C's: Music Downloading, Sales Displacement, and Social Welfare in a Sample of College Students
Waldfogel w17503 Copyright Protection, Technological Change, and the Quality of New Products: Evidence from Recorded Music since Napster
Oberholzer-Gee and Strumpf File Sharing and Copyright
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us