NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Search in Macroeconomic Models of the Labor Market

Richard Rogerson, Robert Shimer

NBER Working Paper No. 15901
Issued in April 2010
NBER Program(s):   EFG

This chapter assesses how models with search frictions have shaped our understanding of aggregate labor market outcomes in two contexts: business cycle fluctuations and long-run (trend) changes. We first consolidate data on aggregate labor market outcomes for a large set of OECD countries. We then ask how models with search improve our understanding of these data. Our results are mixed. Search models are useful for interpreting the behavior of some additional data series, but search frictions per se do not seem to improve our understanding of movements in total hours at either business cycle frequencies or in the long-run. Still, models with search seem promising as a framework for understanding how different wage setting processes affect aggregate labor market outcomes.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w15901

Published: Search in Macroeconomic Models of the Labor Market,” 2010, wit h Richard Rogerson, Handbook of Labor Economics , volume 4A, edited by Orley Ashenfelter and David Card, 619–700.

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