NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Recent Developments in Intergenerational Mobility

Sandra E. Black, Paul J. Devereux

NBER Working Paper No. 15889
Issued in April 2010
NBER Program(s):   CH   ED   LS

Economists and social scientists have long been interested in intergenerational mobility, and documenting the persistence between parents and children's outcomes has been an active area of research. However, since Gary Solon's 1999 Chapter in the Handbook of Labor Economics, the literature has taken an interesting turn. In addition to focusing on obtaining precise estimates of correlations and elasticities, the literature has placed increased emphasis on the causal mechanisms that underlie this relationship. This chapter describes the developments in the intergenerational transmission literature since the 1999 Handbook Chapter. While there have been some important contributions in terms of measurement of elasticities and correlations, we focus primarily on advances in our understanding of the forces driving the relationship and less on the precision of the correlations themselves.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w15889

Published: Recent Developments in Intergenerational Mobility, in Handbook of Labor Economics, Orley Ashenfelter and David Card, editors, North Holland Press, Elsevier, 2011. Also available as NBER Working Paper Number 15889, April 2010. (Joint with Paul Devereux)

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