NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Sample Selectivity and the Validity of International Student Achievement Tests in Economic Research

Eric A. Hanushek, Ludger Woessmann

NBER Working Paper No. 15867
Issued in April 2010
NBER Program(s):   ED   EFG   LS   PE

Critics of international student comparisons argue that results may be influenced by differences in the extent to which countries adequately sample their entire student populations. In this research note, we show that larger exclusion and non-response rates are related to better country average scores on international tests, as are larger enrollment rates for the relevant age group. However, accounting for sample selectivity does not alter existing research findings that tested academic achievement can account for a majority of international differences in economic growth and that institutional features of school systems have important effects on international differences in student achievement.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w15867

Published: Hanushek, Eric A. & Woessmann, Ludger, 2011. "Sample selectivity and the validity of international student achievement tests in economic research," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 110(2), pages 79-82, February. citation courtesy of

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