NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Agriculture, Roads, and Economic Development in Uganda

Douglas Gollin, Richard Rogerson

NBER Working Paper No. 15863
Issued in April 2010
NBER Program(s):   PE   PR

A large fraction of Uganda's population continues to earn a living from quasi-subsistence agriculture. This paper uses a static general equilibrium model to explore the relationships between high transportation costs, low productivity, and the size of the quasi-subsistence sector. We parameterize the model to replicate some key features of the Ugandan data, and we then perform a series of quantitative experiments. Our results suggest that the population in quasi-subsistence agriculture is highly sensitive both to agricultural productivity levels and to transportation costs. The model also suggests positive complementarities between improvements in agricultural productivity and transportation.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w15863

Forthcoming: Agriculture, Roads, and Economic Development in Uganda, Douglas Gollin, Richard Rogerson. in African Successes: Sustainable Growth, Edwards, Johnson, and Weil. 2014

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