NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Climate Shocks and Exports

Benjamin F. Jones, Benjamin A. Olken

NBER Working Paper No. 15711
Issued in January 2010
NBER Program(s):   EEE   EFG   ITI

This paper uses international trade data to examine the effects of climate shocks on economic activity. We examine panel models relating the annual growth rate of a country’s exports in a particular product category to the country’s weather in that year. We find that a poor country being 1 degree Celsius warmer in a given year reduces the growth rate of that country’s exports by between 2.0 and 5.7 percentage points, with no detectable effects in rich countries. We find negative effects of temperature on exports of both agricultural products and light manufacturing products, with little apparent effects on heavy industry or raw materials. The results confirm large negative effects of temperature on poor countries’ economies and suggest that temperature affects a much wider range of economic activity than conventionally thought.

download in pdf format
   (73 K)

email paper

This paper is available as PDF (73 K) or via email.

Acknowledgments

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w15711

Published: Benjamin F. Jones & Benjamin A. Olken, 2010. "Climate Shocks and Exports," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(2), pages 454-59, May.

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Dell, Jones, and Olken w14132 Climate Change and Economic Growth: Evidence from the Last Half Century
Pindyck w15692 Modeling the Impact of Warming in Climate Change Economics
Graff Zivin and Neidell w15717 Temperature and the Allocation of Time: Implications for Climate Change
Dell, Jones, and Olken w14680 Temperature and Income: Reconciling New Cross-Sectional and Panel Estimates
Ahn, Khandelwal, and Wei w15706 The Role of Intermediaries in Facilitating Trade
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us