NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

The Effect of Employment Protection on Worker Effort: Evidence from Public Schooling

Brian A. Jacob

NBER Working Paper No. 15655
Issued in February 2010
NBER Program(s):   CH   ED   LS   PE

This paper studies the effect of employment protection on worker productivity and firm output in the context of a public school system. In 2004, the Chicago Public Schools (CPS) and Chicago Teachers Union (CTU) signed a new collective bargaining agreement that gave principals the flexibility to dismiss probationary teachers (defined as those with less than five years of experience) for any reason, and without the elaborate documentation and hearing process typical in many large, urban school districts. Results suggest that the policy reduced annual teacher absences by roughly 10 percent and reduced the prevalence of teachers with 15 or more annual absences by 20 percent. The effects were strongest among teachers in elementary schools and in low-achieving, predominantly African-American high schools, and among teachers with highpredicted absences. There is also evidence that the impact of the policy increased substantially after its first year.

download in pdf format
   (858 K)

email paper

This paper is available as PDF (858 K) or via email.

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w15655

Jacob, Brian A. (Forthcoming). “The Effect of Employment Protection on Worker Effort: Evidence from Public Schooling.” Journal of Labor Economics.

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Jacob w15715 Do Principals Fire the Worst Teachers?
Dee and Jacob w15531 The Impact of No Child Left Behind on Student Achievement
Baran, Sapienza, and Zingales w15654 Can we infer social preferences from the lab? Evidence from the trust game
Mulligan w14729 What Caused the Recession of 2008? Hints from Labor Productivity
Cunha and Heckman w14695 The Economics and Psychology of Inequality and Human Development
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us