NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Do Some Enterprise Zones Create Jobs?

Jed Kolko, David Neumark

NBER Working Paper No. 15206
Issued in August 2009
NBER Program(s):   LS

We study how the employment effects of enterprise zones vary with their location, implementation, and administration, based on evidence from California. We use new establishment-level data and geographic mapping methods, coupled with a survey of enterprise zone administrators. Overall, the evidence indicates that enterprise zones do not increase employment. However, the evidence also suggests that the enterprise zone program has a more favorable effect on employment in zones that have a lower share of manufacturing and in zones where managers report doing more marketing and outreach activities. On the other hand, devoting more effort to helping firms get hiring tax credits reduces or eliminates any positive employment effects, which may be attributable to idiosyncrasies of California's enterprise zone program during the period we study.

download in pdf format
   (583 K)

email paper

This paper is available as PDF (583 K) or via email.

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w15206

Published: Jed Kolko & David Neumark, 2010. "Do some enterprise zones create jobs?," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(1), pages 5-38. citation courtesy of

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Neumark and Kolko w14530 Do Enterprise Zones Create Jobs? Evidence from California's Enterprise Zone Program
Papke What Do We Know about Enterprise Zones?
Kolko, Neumark, and Cuellar Mejia w16968 What Do Business Climate Indexes Teach Us About State Policy and Economic Growth?
Neumark w16866 Spurring Job Creation in Response to Severe Recessions: Reconsidering Hiring Credits
Busso, Gregory, and Kline w16096 Assessing the Incidence and Efficiency of a Prominent Place Based Policy
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us