NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

The Growth of Low Skill Service Jobs and the Polarization of the U.S. Labor Market

David H. Autor, David Dorn

NBER Working Paper No. 15150
Issued in July 2009
NBER Program(s):   LS

We offer an integrated explanation and empirical analysis of the polarization of U.S. employment and wages between 1980 and 2005, and the concurrent growth of low skill service occupations. We attribute polarization to the interaction between consumer preferences, which favor variety over specialization, and the falling cost of automating routine, codifiable job tasks. Applying a spatial equilibrium model, we derive, test, and confirm four implications of this hypothesis. Local labor markets that were specialized in routine activities differentially adopted information technology, reallocated low skill labor into service occupations (employment polarization), experienced earnings growth at the tails of the distribution (wage polarization), and received inflows of skilled labor.

download in pdf format
   (1132 K)

email paper

This paper was revised on May 14, 2012

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w15150

Published: David H. Autor & David Dorn, 2013. "The Growth of Low-Skill Service Jobs and the Polarization of the US Labor Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(5), pages 1553-97, August. citation courtesy of

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Autor and Handel w15116 Putting Tasks to the Test: Human Capital, Job Tasks and Wages
Autor, Levy, and Murnane w8337 The Skill Content of Recent Technological Change: An Empirical Exploration
Acemoglu and Autor w16082 Skills, Tasks and Technologies: Implications for Employment and Earnings
Michaels, Natraj, and Van Reenen w16138 Has ICT Polarized Skill Demand? Evidence from Eleven Countries over 25 years
Autor, Katz, and Kearney w11986 The Polarization of the U.S. Labor Market
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Themes
Data
People
About

National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us