NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Life at the top: the benefits of height

Angus S. Deaton, Raksha Arora

NBER Working Paper No. 15090
Issued in June 2009
NBER Program(s):   AG   HC

According to the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index daily poll of the US population, taller people live better lives, at least on average. They evaluate their lives more favorably, and they are more likely to report a range of positive emotions such as enjoyment and happiness. They are also less likely to report a range of negative experiences, like sadness, and physical pain, though they are more likely to experience stress and anger, and if they are women, to worry. These findings cannot be attributed to different demographic or ethnic characteristics of taller people, but are almost entirely explained by the positive association between height and both income and education, both of which are positively linked to better lives.

download in pdf format
   (49 K)

email paper

The NBER Bulletin on Aging and Health provides summaries of publications like this.  You can sign up to receive the NBER Bulletin on Aging and Health by email.

This paper is available as PDF (49 K) or via email.

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w15090

Published: Deaton, Angus & Arora, Raksha, 2009. "Life at the top: The benefits of height," Economics and Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 133-136, July. citation courtesy of

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Case and Paxson w12466 Stature and Status: Height, Ability, and Labor Market Outcomes
Deaton w15271 Aging, religion, and health
Bodenhorn, Moehling, and Price w15945 Short Criminals: Stature and Crime in Early America
Komlos w14635 Recent Trends in Height by Gender and Ethnicity in the US in Relation to Levels of Income
Persico, Postlewaite, and Silverman w10522 The Effect of Adolescent Experience on Labor Market Outcomes: The Case of Height
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us