NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Life Expectancy and Old Age Savings

Mariacristina De Nardi, Eric French, John Bailey Jones

NBER Working Paper No. 14653
Issued in January 2009
NBER Program(s):   AG   HE   PE

Rich people, women, and healthy people live longer. We document that this heterogeneity in life expectancy is large, and we use an estimated structural model to assess its effect on the elderly's saving. We find that the differences in life expectancy related to observable factors such as income, gender, and health have large effects on savings, and that these factors contribute by similar amounts. We also show that the risk of outliving one's expected lifespan has a large effect on the elderly's saving behavior.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w14653

Published: Mariacristina De Nardi & Eric French & John Bailey Jones, 2009. "Life Expectancy and Old Age Savings," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(2), pages 110-15, May. citation courtesy of

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