NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

The Structure of Protection and Growth in the Late 19th Century

Sibylle H. Lehmann, Kevin H. O'Rourke

NBER Working Paper No. 14493
Issued in November 2008
NBER Program(s):   DAE   ITI

Many papers have explored the relationship between average tariff rates and economic growth, when theory suggests that the structure of protection is what should matter. We therefore explore the relationship between economic growth and agricultural tariffs, industrial tariffs, and revenue tariffs, for a sample of relatively well-developed countries between 1875 and 1913. Industrial tariffs were positively correlated with growth. Agricultural tariffs were negatively correlated with growth, although the relationship was often statistically insignificant at conventional levels. There was no relationship between revenue tariffs and growth.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w14493

Published: May 2011, Vol. 93, No. 2, Pages 606-616 Posted Online April 26, 2011. (doi:10.1162/REST_a_00104) © 2011 The President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology The Structure of Protection and Growth in the Late Nineteenth Century Sibylle H. Lehmann Universität Köln Kevin H. O'Rourke

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