NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

What Are the Driving Forces of International Business Cycles?

Mario J. Crucini, M. Ayhan Kose, Christopher Otrok

NBER Working Paper No. 14380
Issued in October 2008
NBER Program(s):   IFM

We examine the driving forces of G-7 business cycles. We decompose national business cycles into common and nation-specific components using a dynamic factor model. We also do this for driving variables found in business cycle models: productivity; measures of fiscal and monetary policy; the terms of trade and oil prices. We find a large common factor in oil prices, productivity, and the terms of trade. Productivity is the main driving force, with other drivers isolated to particular nations or sub-periods. Along these lines, we document shifts in the correlation of the G-7 component of each driver with the overall G-7 cycle.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w14380

Published: Mario Crucini & Ayhan Kose & Christopher Otrok. "What are the driving forces of international business cycles?," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics. Volume 14, Issue 1. (January 2011) citation courtesy of

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