NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Testing for the Economic Impact of the U.S. Constitution: Purchasing Power Parity across the Colonies versus across the States, 1748-1811

Farley Grubb

NBER Working Paper No. 13836
Issued in March 2008
NBER Program(s):   DAE

The U.S. Constitution removed real and monetary trade barriers between the states. By contrast, these states when they were British colonies exercised considerable real and monetary autonomy over their borders. Purchasing power parity is used to measure how much economic integration between the states was gained in the decades after the Constitution’s adoption compared with what existed among the same locations during the late colonial period. The U.S. Constitution’s net contribution to the economic integration of the nation is found, using this method, to be not as large as is commonly supposed.

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This paper was revised on December 5, 2011

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w13836

Published: Grubb, Farley, 2010. "Testing for the Economic Impact of the U.S. Constitution: Purchasing Power Parity Across the Colonies versus Across the States, 1748?1811," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 70(01), pages 118-145, March. citation courtesy of

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