NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Do On-Line Labor Market Intermediaries Matter? The Impact of AlmaLaurea on the University-to-Work Transition

Manuel F. Bagues, Mauro Sylos Labini

NBER Working Paper No. 13621
Issued in November 2007
NBER Program(s):   LS

This paper evaluates the impact of the availability of electronic labor markets on the university-to-work transition. In particular, we analyze the effect of the intermediation activity carried on by the inter-university consortium, AlmaLaurea, on graduates' labor market outcomes. The different timing of universities' enrollment in AlmaLaurea allows us to apply the difference-in-differences method to a repeated cross section data set. If the usual assumption concerning parallel outcomes holds, AlmaLaurea reduces the individual unemployment probability and improves matching quality. Interestingly, we also find that on-line intermediaries foster graduates' geographic mobility.

download in pdf format
   (458 K)

email paper

This paper is available as PDF (458 K) or via email.

This paper was revised on September 5, 2008

Acknowledgments

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w13621

Published: Do Online Labor Market Intermediaries Matter? The Impact of AlmaLaurea on the University-to-Work Transition, Manuel F. Bagues, Mauro Sylos Labini. in Studies of Labor Market Intermediation , Autor. 2009

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Freeman w9254 The Labour Market in the New Information Economy
Bagues and Labini Do Online Labor Market Intermediaries Matter? The Impact of AlmaLaurea on the University-to-Work Transition
Autor w14348 The Economics of Labor Market Intermediation: An Analytic Framework
Autor Introduction to "Studies of Labor Market Intermediation"
Stevenson w13886 The Internet and Job Search
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us