NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Child Mental Health and Human Capital Accumulation: The Case of ADHD Revisited

Jason Fletcher, Barbara L. Wolfe

NBER Working Paper No. 13474
Issued in October 2007
NBER Program(s):   CH   HE   ED

Recently, Currie and Stabile (2006) made a significant contribution to our understanding of the influence of ADHD symptoms on a variety of school outcomes including participation in special education, grade repetition and test scores. Their contributions include using a broad sample of children and estimating sibling fixed effects models to control for unobserved family effects. In this paper we look at a sample of older children and confirm and extend many of the JCMS findings in terms of a broader set of measures of human capital and additional specifications.

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This paper was revised on February 13, 2008

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w13474

Published: Fletcher, Jason & Wolfe, Barbara, 2008. "Child mental health and human capital accumulation: The case of ADHD revisited," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 794-800, May.

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