NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Temporary Help Agencies and the Advancement Prospects of Low Earners

Fredrik Andersson, Harry J. Holzer, Julia Lane

NBER Working Paper No. 13434
Issued in September 2007
NBER Program(s):   LS

In this paper we use a very large matched database on firms and employees to analyze the use of temporary agencies by low earners, and to estimate the impact of temp employment on subsequent employment outcomes for these workers. Our results show that, while temp workers have lower earnings than others while working at these agencies, their subsequent earnings are often higher - but only if they manage to gain stable work with other employers. Furthermore, the positive effects seem mostly to occur because those working for temp agencies subsequently gain access to higher-wage firms than do comparable low earners who do not work for temps. The positive effects we find seem to persist for up to six years beyond the period during which the temp employment occurred.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w13434

Published: Temporary Help Agencies and the Advancement Prospects of Low Earners, Fredrik Andersson, Harry J. Holzer, Julia Lane. in Studies of Labor Market Intermediation , Autor. 2009

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