NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Social Identity and Preferences

Daniel J. Benjamin, James J. Choi, A. Joshua Strickland

NBER Working Paper No. 13309
Issued in August 2007
NBER Program(s):   AG   LS

Social identities prescribe behaviors for people. We identify the marginal behavioral effect of these norms on discount rates and risk aversion by measuring how laboratory subjects’ choices change when an aspect of social identity is made salient. When we make ethnic identity salient to Asian-American subjects, they make more patient choices. When we make racial identity salient to black subjects, non-immigrant blacks (but not immigrant blacks) make more patient choices. Making gender identity salient has no effect on intertemporal or risk choices.

download in pdf format
   (234 K)

email paper

The NBER Bulletin on Aging and Health provides summaries of publications like this.  You can sign up to receive the NBER Bulletin on Aging and Health by email.

This paper is available as PDF (234 K) or via email.

This paper was revised on September 21, 2009

Acknowledgments

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Published: Daniel J. Benjamin & James J. Choi & A. Joshua Strickland, 2010. "Social Identity and Preferences," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(4), pages 1913-28, September.

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Benjamin, Choi, and Fisher w15925 Religious Identity and Economic Behavior
Bodenhorn and Ruebeck w9962 The Economics of Identity and the Endogeneity of Race
List, Sadoff, and Wagner w15701 So you want to run an experiment, now what? Some Simple Rules of Thumb for Optimal Experimental Design
Ruebeck, Averett, and Bodenhorn w13793 Acting White or Acting Black: Mixed-Race Adolescents' Identity and Behavior
Fryer and Loury w16568 Valuing Identity
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us