NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Liquidity and Trading Dynamics

Veronica Guerrieri, Guido Lorenzoni

NBER Working Paper No. 13204
Issued in June 2007
NBER Program(s):   EFG   ME

How do financial frictions affect the response of an economy to aggregate shocks? In this paper, we address this question, focusing on liquidity constraints and uninsurable idiosyncratic risk. We consider a search model where agents use liquid assets to smooth individual income shocks. We show that the response of this economy to aggregate shocks depends on the rate of return on liquid assets. In economies where liquid assets pay a low return, agents hold smaller liquid reserves and the response of the economy tends to be larger. In this case, agents expect to be liquidity constrained and, due to a self-insurance motive, their consumption decisions are more sensitive to changes in expected income. On the other hand, in economies where liquid assets pay a large return, agents hold larger reserves and their consumption decisions are more insulated from income uncertainty. Therefore, aggregate shocks tend to have larger effects if liquid assets pay a lower rate of return.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w13204

Published: Veronica Guerrieri & Guido Lorenzoni, 2009. "Liquidity and Trading Dynamics," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 77(6), pages 1751-1790, November.

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