NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Why is the Dollar So High?

Martin Feldstein

NBER Working Paper No. 13114
Issued in May 2007
NBER Program(s):   IFM   ITI

The level of the dollar is part of a complex general equilibrium system. Nevertheless, it is helpful to recognize that the high level of the dollar is necessary to generate the current account deficit equal to the difference between national saving and investment. Understanding the high level of the dollar therefore requires understanding the reasons for the low level of national saving in the United States. Reducing the large current account deficit will require both a higher rate of national saving and a more competitive dollar. Although the necessary decline in the real value of the dollar can in theory occur without a decline in the dollar's nominal value, the implied magnitude of the fall in the domestic price level is implausible. A decline of the real value of the dollar that is large enough to reduce the current account deficit significantly requires a significant decline in the nominal value of the dollar.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w13114

Published: Feldstein, Martin, 2007. "Why is the dollar so high?," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 661-667.

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