NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

As Low Birth Weight Babies Grow, Can 'Good' Parents Buffer this Adverse Factor? A Research Note.

Ming-Jen Lin, Jin-Tan Liu, Shin-Yi Chou

NBER Working Paper No. 12857
Issued in January 2007
NBER Program(s):   HE

This research note combines two national Taiwanese datasets to investigate the relationship between low birth weight (LBW) babies, their family background and their future academic outcomes. We find that LBW is negatively correlated with the probability of such children attending university at the age of 18; however, when both parents are college or senior high school graduates, such negative effects may be partially offset. We also show that discrimination against daughters does occur, but only in those cases where the daughters were LBW babies. Moreover, high parental education (HPE) can only buffer the LBW shock among moderately-LBW children (as compared to very-LBW children) and full term-LBW children (as compared to preterm-LBW children).

download in pdf format
   (160 K)

email paper

The NBER Bulletin on Aging and Health provides summaries of publications like this.  You can sign up to receive the NBER Bulletin on Aging and Health by email.

This paper is available as PDF (160 K) or via email.

Acknowledgments

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Published: Lin, Ming-Jen, Jin-Tan Liu, and Shin-Yi Chou. "As Low Birth Weight Babies Grow, Can 'Good' Parents Buffer this Adverse Factor? A Research Note." Demography 44, 2 (May 2007): 335-343.

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Almond, Chay, and Lee w10552 The Costs of Low Birth Weight
Currie and Hyson w6999 Is the Impact of Health Shocks Cushioned by Socioeconomic Status? The Case of Low Birthweight
Black, Devereux, and Salvanes w11796 From the Cradle to the Labor Market? The Effect of Birth Weight on Adult Outcomes
Case, Fertig, and Paxson w9788 From Cradle to Grave? The Lasting Impact of Childhood Health and Circumstance
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us