NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

The Interaction of Residential Segregation and Employment Discrimination

Jonathan S. Leonard

NBER Working Paper No. 1274
Issued in February 1984
NBER Program(s):LS

This paper seeks to disentangle the impactof residential segregation from that of employment discrimination in determining black employment share. The major finding is that distance of a workplace from the main ghetto is one of the strongest and most significant determinants of both changes over time and levels of the racial composition of the workforce. This paper presents evidence of more heterogeneous micro labor supply within SMSA's than has usually been recognized for policy purposes. Comparing Chicago with Los Angeles, we find that distance from the ghetto has a stronger impact in Chicago, and that this effect increased during the late 1970's. In contrast, residential segregation is relatively less important indetermining workplace demographics in Los Angeles, despite its rudimentary public transit system and prototypical job dispersion. In both cities,residential segregation strongly influences black employment patterns and limits the efficacy of efforts to integrate the workplace.

download in pdf format
   (260 K)

email paper

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w1274

Published: Leonard, Jonathan S. "The Interaction of Residential Segregation and Employment Discrimination," Journal of Urban Economics, Vol. 21, no. 3, May 1987, pp. 323-346. citation courtesy of

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded* these:
Watson w14908 Inequality and the Measurement of Residential Segregation by Income In American Neighborhoods
Ellwood The Spatial Mismatch Hypothesis: Are There Teenage Jobs Missing in the Ghetto?
Doyle w13291 Child Protection and Adult Crime: Using Investigator Assignment to Estimate Causal Effects of Foster Care
Bayer, Fang, and McMillan w11507 Separate When Equal? Racial Inequality and Residential Segregation
Freeman w0928 Public Policy and Employment Discrimination in the U.S.
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Themes
Data
People
About

National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us