NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Inequality and Schooling Responses to Globalization Forces: Lessons from History

Jeffrey G. Williamson

NBER Working Paper No. 12553
Issued in October 2006
NBER Program(s):   DAE   ED   LS   POL   ITI

In the first global century before 1914, trade and especially migration had profound effects on both low-wage, labor abundant Europe and the high-wage, labor scarce New World. Those global forces contributed to a reduction in unskilled labor scarcity in the New World and to a rise in unskilled labor scarcity in Europe. Thus, it contributed to rising inequality in overseas countries, like the United States, and falling inequality in most of Europe. Falling unskilled labor scarcity and rising skill scarcity contributed to the high school revolution in the US. Rising unskilled scarcity also contributed to the primary schooling and literacy revolution in Europe. Under what conditions would we expect the same responses to globalization in today’s world? This paper argues that modern debates about inequality and schooling responses to globalization should pay more attention to history.

download in pdf format
   (147 K)

email paper

This paper is available as PDF (147 K) or via email.

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w12553

Published: Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2006. "Inequality and schooling responses to globalization forces: lessons from history," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, pages 225-248.

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Williamson w5491 "Globalization and Inequality Past and Present"
Hatton and Williamson w12414 What Determines Immigration's Impact? Comparing Two Global Centuries
Milanovic, Lindert, and Williamson w13550 Measuring Ancient Inequality
O'Rourke w8339 Globalization and Inequality: Historical Trends
Lindert and Williamson Does Globalization Make the World More Unequal?
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us