NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

The Importance of Default Options for Retirement Savings Outcomes: Evidence from the United States

John Beshears, James J. Choi, David Laibson, Brigitte C. Madrian

NBER Working Paper No. 12009
Issued in February 2006
NBER Program(s):   AG   EFG   PE

This paper summarizes the empirical evidence on how defaults impact retirement savings outcomes. After outlining the salient features of the various sources of retirement income in the U.S., the paper presents the empirical evidence on how defaults impact retirement savings outcomes at all stages of the savings lifecycle, including savings plan participation, savings rates, asset allocation, and post-retirement savings distributions. The paper then discusses why defaults have such a tremendous impact on savings outcomes. The paper concludes with a discussion of the role of public policy towards retirement saving when defaults matter.

download in pdf format
   (508 K)

email paper

A non-technical summary of this paper is available in the NBER Bulletin on Aging and Health. You can sign up to receive the NBER Bulletin on Aging and Health by email.

This paper is available as PDF (508 K) or via email.

This paper was revised on March 15, 2007

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w12009

Published:

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Beshears, Choi, Laibson, and Madrian The Importance of Default Options for Retirement Saving Outcomes: Evidence from the United States
Choi, Laibson, Madrian, and Metrick For Better or for Worse: Default Effects and 401(k) Savings Behavior
Shleifer and Vishny w5167 The Limits of Arbitrage
Beshears, Choi, Laibson, and Madrian w13352 The Impact of Employer Matching on Savings Plan Participation under Automatic Enrollment
O'Neill and O'Neill w13429 Health Status, Health Care and Inequality: Canada vs. the U.S.
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us