NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Female Socialization: How Daughters Affect Their Legislator Fathers' Voting on Women's Issues

Ebonya Washington

NBER Working Paper No. 11924
Issued in January 2006
NBER Program(s):   CH   POL

Economists have long concerned themselves with environmental influences, such as neighborhood, peers and family on individuals' beliefs and behaviors. However, the impact of children on parents' behavior has been little studied. Parenting daughters, psychologists have shown, increases feminist sympathies. I test the hypothesis that children, much like neighbors or peers, can influence adult behavior. I demonstrate that the propensity to vote liberally on reproductive rights is significantly increasing in a congress person's proportion of daughters. The result demonstrates not only the relevance of child to parent behavioral influence, but also the importance of personal ideology in a legislator's voting decisions as it is not explained away by voter preferences.

download in pdf format
   (207 K)

email paper

A non-technical summary of this paper is available in the March 2006 NBER digest.  You can sign up to receive the NBER Digest by email.

This paper is available as PDF (207 K) or via email.

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w11924

Published: Washington, Ebonya Lia. “Female Socialization: How Daughters Affect Their Legislator Fathers’ Voting on Women’s Issues.” American Economic Review 98, 1 (2008): 311-332.

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Edlund and Kopczuk w13162 Women, Wealth and Mobility
Acemoglu w11940 Modeling Inefficient Institutions
Conley and Rauscher w15873 The Effect of Daughters on Partisanship
Mullainathan and Washington w11910 Sticking with Your Vote: Cognitive Dissonance and Voting
Figlio w11277 Boys Named Sue: Disruptive Children and their Peers
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us