NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Dams

Esther Duflo, Rohini Pande

NBER Working Paper No. 11711
Issued in October 2005
NBER Program(s):   PE

The construction of large dams is one of the most costly and controversial forms of public infrastructure investment in developing countries, but little is known about their impact. This paper studies the productivity and distributional effects of large dams in India. To account for endogenous placement of dams we use GIS data and the fact that river gradient affects a district's suitability for dams to provide instrumental variable estimates of their impact. We find that, in a district where a dam is built, agricultural production does not increase but poverty does. In contrast, districts located downstream from the dam benefit from increased irrigation and see agricultural production increase and poverty fall. Overall, our estimates suggest that large dam construction in India is a marginally cost-effective investment with significant distributional implications, and has, in aggregate, increased poverty.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w11711

Published: Esther Duflo & Rohini Pande, 2007. "Dams," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 122(2), pages 601-646, 05. citation courtesy of

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