NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Race and Health Disparities Among Seniors in Urban Areas in Brazil

Antonio J. Trujillo, John A. Vernon, Laura Rodriguez Wong, Gustavo Angeles

NBER Working Paper No. 11690
Issued in October 2005
NBER Program(s):   HE

White seniors report better health than Black seniors in urban areas in Sao Paulo, Brazil. This is the case even after controlling for baseline health conditions and several demographic, socio-economic and family support characteristics. Furthermore, adjusted racial disparities in self-reported health are larger than the disparities found using alternative measures of functional health. Our empirical research in this paper suggests that the two most important factors driving racial disparities in health among seniors (in our sample) are historical differences in rural living conditions and current income. Present economic conditions are more relevant to racial disparities among poor seniors

than among rich seniors. Moreover, racial differences in health not attributable to observable characteristics are more important when comparing individuals in the upper half of the income distribution.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w11690

Published: Trujillo, Antonio J., John A. Vernon, Laura Rodriguez Wong, and Gustavo Angeles. "Race and Health Disparities Among Seniors in Urban Areas in Brazil." Journal of Aging and Health 21, 1 (2009): 3-37.

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