NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Separate When Equal? Racial Inequality and Residential Segregation

Patrick Bayer, Hanming Fang, Robert McMillan

NBER Working Paper No. 11507
Issued in August 2005
NBER Program(s):   ED   PE

This paper hypothesizes that segregation in US cities increases as racial inequality narrows due to the emergence of middle-class black neighborhoods. Employing a novel research design based on life-cycle variations in the relationship between segregation and inequality, we test this hypothesis using the 1990 and 2000 Censuses. Indeed, increased black educational attainment in a city leads to a significant rise in the number of middle-class black communities and segregation for older adults both in the cross-section and over time, consistent with our hypothesis. These findings imply a negative feedback loop that inhibits reductions in racial inequality and segregation over time.

download in pdf format
   (844 K)

email paper

This paper is available as PDF (844 K) or via email.

This paper was revised on June 27, 2011

Acknowledgments

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Fryer w16256 Racial Inequality in the 21st Century: The Declining Significance of Discrimination
Bayer and McMillan w11813 Racial Sorting and Neighborhood Quality
Bayer, McMillan, and Rueben w10865 An Equilibrium Model of Sorting in an Urban Housing Market
Watson w14908 Inequality and the Measurement of Residential Segregation by Income In American Neighborhoods
Bayer, McMillan, and Rueben w11095 Residential Segregation in General Equilibrium
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us