NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Mexican Immigration and Self-Selection: New Evidence from the 2000 Mexican Census

Pablo Ibarraran, Darren Lubotsky

NBER Working Paper No. 11456
Issued in July 2005
NBER Program(s):   LS

We use data from the 2000 Mexican Census to examine how the education and socioeconomic status of Mexican immigrants to the United States compares to that of non-migrants in Mexico. Our primary conclusion is that migrants tend to be less educated than non-migrants. This finding is consistent with the idea that the return to education is higher in Mexico than in the United States, and thus the wage gain to migrating is proportionately smaller for high-educated Mexicans than it is for lower-educated Mexicans. We also find that the degree of negative selection of migrants is stronger in Mexican counties that have a higher return to education.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w11456

Published: Mexican Immigration and Self-Selection: New Evidence from the 2000 Mexican Census , Pablo Ibarraran, Darren Lubotsky. in Mexican Immigration to the United States, Borjas. 2007

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