NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

The Great Escape: A Review Essay on Fogel's 'The Escape from Hunger and Premature Death, 1700-2100'

Angus Deaton

NBER Working Paper No. 11308
Issued in May 2005
NBER Program(s):Aging, Children, Health Care

In this essay, I review Robert Fogel's The Escape from Hunger and Premature Death, 1700-2100 which is concerned with the past, present, and future of human health. Fogel's work places great emphasis on nutrition, not only for the history of health, but for explaining aspects of current health, not only in comparing poor and rich countries, but in thinking about rich countries now and in the future. I discuss Fogel's analysis alongside alternative interpretations that place greater emphasis on the historical role of public health, and on the current and future role of improvements in medical technology.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w11308

Published: Deaton, Angus. "The Great Escape: A Review Of Robert Fogel's The Escape From Hunger and Premature Death, 1700-2100," Journal of Economic Literature, 2006, v44(1,Mar), 106-114.

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