NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Why Have Housing Prices Gone Up?

Edward L. Glaeser, Joseph Gyourko, Raven Saks

NBER Working Paper No. 11129
Issued in February 2005
NBER Program(s):   EFG

Since 1950, housing prices have risen regularly by almost two percent per year. Between 1950 and 1970, this increase reflects rising housing quality and construction costs. Since 1970, this increase reflects the increasing difficulty of obtaining regulatory approval for building new homes. In this paper, we present a simple model of regulatory approval that suggests a number of explanations for this change including changing judicial tastes, decreasing ability to bribe regulators, rising incomes and greater tastes for amenities, and improvements in the ability of homeowners to organize and influence local decisions. Our preliminary evidence suggests that there was a significant increase in the ability of local residents to block new projects and a change of cities from urban growth machines to homeowners' cooperatives.

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Published: Glaeser, Edward L., Joseph Gyourko and Raven E. Saks. "Why Have Housing Prices Gone Up?," American Economic Review, 2005, v95(2,May), 329-333.

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