NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

The Foreign Service and Foreign Trade: Embassies as Export Promotion

Andrew K. Rose

NBER Working Paper No. 11111
Issued in February 2005
NBER Program(s):   ITI

As communication costs fall, foreign embassies and consulates have lost much of their role in decision-making and information-gathering. Accordingly, foreign services are increasingly marketing themselves as agents of export promotion. I investigate whether exports are in fact systematically associated with diplomatic representation abroad. I use a recent cross-section of data covering twenty-two large exporters and two-hundred import destinations. Bilateral exports rise by approximately 6-10% for each additional consulate abroad, controlling for a host of other features including reverse causality. The effect varies by exporter, and is non-linear; consulates have smaller effects than the creation of an embassy.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w11111

Published: Andrew K. Rose, 2007. "The Foreign Service and Foreign Trade: Embassies as Export Promotion," The World Economy, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 30(1), pages 22-38, 01. citation courtesy of

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