NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Can Endogenous Changes in Price Flexibility Alter the Relative Welfare Performance of Exchange Rate Regimes?

Ozge Senay, Alan Sutherland

NBER Working Paper No. 11092
Issued in January 2005
NBER Program(s):   IFM

A dynamic general equilibrium model of a small open economy is presented where agents may choose the frequency of price changes. A fixed exchange rate is compared to inflation targeting and money targeting. A fixed rate generates more price flexibility than the other regimes when the expenditure switching effect is relatively weak, while money targeting generates more flexibility when the expenditure switching effect is strong. These endogenous changes in price flexibility can lead to changes in the welfare performance of regimes. But, for the model calibration considered here, the extra price flexibility generated by a peg does not compensate for the loss of monetary independence. Inflation targeting yields the highest welfare level despite generating the least price

flexibility of the three regimes considered.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w11092

Published: Can Endogenous Changes in Price Flexibility Alter the Relative Welfare Performance of Exchange Rate Regimes?, Ozge Senay, Alan Sutherland. in NBER International Seminar on Macroeconomics 2004, Clarida, Frankel, Giavazzi, and West. 2006

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